Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Lab 10: Save the pixels


Save the Pixels Lab (5%)

Take portraits of each other outside, using a white foam core as background, creating the Richard Avedon “American West” look. Fill your frame with the white so that we don’t see any of the outdoors. Try with and without a reflector in order to fill in the shadows in the eyes. If it is sunny shoot completely in the shadow of a building (no sun in the image). You will need to photograph three people. Try to capture interesting expressions as well as fulfilling the technical assignment.


-Work in groups of 4 (photographer, subject, assistant to hold the backdrop, assistant to hold a reflector)
-Make sure to expose properly (knowing that your camera will want to underexpose because of the white background).
-Use a medium to shallow DOF
-If using a higher ISO (if it's dark out) then use noise reduction
-Make sure not get handshake (you may want to use a tripod)
-Use an appropriate lens so that there is only white behind the subject

Submit 3 "American West" type of portraits.


The lab must be up on your blog before the end of the day.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Lab 9: Time Lapse 2

Camera Works 2
Time-lapse lab 2 (lab 9)
Use a wide angle lens; and a normal (50mm) or telephoto lens.
Use a tripod.
Use a remote trigger if you have one (or the intervalometer)

Before you start make sure your camera battery is charged and you have enough space on your memory card.
Shoot two stop motions, each with 200 or more images
1. Shoot a wide angle shot of an area where there is a good flow of people. Frame carefully, make sure the information is pertinent from edge to edge of your frame. Use a fast shutter speed so that motion is frozen (this may lead you to use a high ISO, and therefore use noise reduction). 
2.  Shoot a shot with your normal or longer lens again in an area where there is a good flow of people. Again frame carefully, make sure the information is pertinent from edge to edge of your frame. Use a slow shutter speed in order to get blurred motion. 

Shoot areas that will relate to your daily life and can be used in your final project (ex: Dawson, the Metro, de Maisonneuve street, etc.)
For both of these stop motions:
Make sure to choose your specific WB, and make sure that your focus is fixed (put it on Manual Mode). You can have a shallow or deep DOF, that is up to you. Make sure to shoot in the same JPG resolution as you did for your last stop motion. (Keep the same resolution from now on)

Put together each of these stop motions in iMovie, use a duration of 0.1 per image. Follow directions from the last lab if you've forgotten how to put together a stop motion in iMovie (also remove the Ken Burns effect from Preferences before adding your images to your timeline)


Put your two mp4 movie in my KHutchinson dropbox by the end of the day today. 


*Images must be in focus, must be a good brightness, and the right colour. Make sure to check all your settings before you begin.*

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Lab 8: Time lapse lab 1


Camera Works 2
Time-lapse lab 1 (lab 8)

To be shot in the photo studio or in the computer lab/printing area if there is not enough room in the studio.

Choose your angle and lens wisely. Talk to those that are using the space and try to understand what space they will occupy so that you can cover as much interesting movement as possible.

Use a tripod, and a remote trigger if you have one.

Before you start:
-Meter carefully. Be in full Manual Mode. Shoot a few exposures. Check your histogram (and blinking highlights) to see if you are exposing properly.
-Choose the WB that relates to the scene you are in. Evaluate the light and correct for the strongest light in the scene (again you should take a few test shots). Create a custom WB for your setting (as we saw earlier on in the semester) if you do not seem able to correct the colour of light with your presets.
-Use Manual Focus. Place your focus with auto if you want and then switch your lens to Manual Focus (so that the focus will not shift).
-If using a high ISO use the appropriate noise reduction (as learned during a previous lab).
-Shoot in small or medium sized JPG Resolution
- Shoot your hand in front of the lens as your last image before the stop motion, this will be a marker as to where your stop motion starts.

For the stop motion:
-Shoot approx. 200 images of the scene
-Import into iMovie:
·      Theater – New Movie – Click on Import Media and bring your images in
·      iMovie – Preferences – Photo Placement (choose Fit), Photo Duration (choose 0.1)
·      Then drag all your images into the timeline at the bottom of the screen
·      You can change the duration for one or more images by clicking on the i
·      You can add music in the Audio section. This will find sound from iTunes and you can drag the song you want in to your timeline. You do not need to add music to this time-lapse (but you do need to for the final)
·      Once your movie looks good go to File – Share – File – Medium quality – 1080p. This may take 30 minutes or more. To see progress click on top right hand circle in your iMovie screen.

This will be used as one of your day in the life clips in your final assignment (so do not loose the images or movie made!)

Put your mp4 movie in my KHutchinson dropbox before the end of the day. 


Intervalometer instructional video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fL4VJAEDdo8

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Class exercise: Painting with light

Part 1 of our assignment: painting with constant light on a small scene (I could have used a snoot on my cell phone in order to avoid the lines of light).



 Part 2 of our assignment: painting with flash in your room. 3 or more flashes


Part 3 of our assignment: painting with light (constant light facing the camera).

Monday, February 26, 2018

Lab 5: Histograms

Camera Works 2
Histogram Lab (5%)

Due on your blog by the end of the day (Feb 27th)

The purpose of this lab is to understand dynamic range & how to read the dynamic range of an image by analyzing the image histogram.

Process:
1.     Photograph a white object in three different scenes (make sure to expose each image well, check to make sure that there are no blinking highlights):
·      A high-key scene (white on white)
·      A low-key scene (all dark scene other than our white object)
·      A scene with a variety of tones
2.     Open the three images in either Photoshop or Lightroom
3.     Take a screen shot of each of the three images’ histograms
4.     Post all three images, along with their histograms. Be sure to identify each item on your post.
5.     Answer these questions on your blog:
a.     According to the histogram, where do most of the pixels in your high key image fall (left or right on the histogram)
b.     Are there any pixels in the high key image that would not print with detail?
c.     According to the histogram, where do most of the pixels in your low-key image fall (left or right on the histogram)
d.     Are there any pixels in the low-key image that would not print with detail?
e.     According to the histogram, where do most of the pixels in your varied tones image fall (left or right on the histogram)
f.      Are there any pixels in the varied tones image that would not print with detail?
g.     Considering the information on the histogram, do you feel your camera is properly exposing the high key and low-key scenes? Explain your answer

h.     Which histogram shows the most dynamic range?

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Lab 3: Noise reduction and WB

Noise Reduction: 


Purpose: to test your in-camera noise reduction settings.

Canon may have low, standard and strong noise reduction settings, while Nikon may have noise reduction for low light and for longer exposure.

For these images make sure that you have a good exposure (and the same exposure throughout) and make sure that you are not shooting a backlit scene.


1. Find a low light scene, lit by daylight, that includes color, details, and various textures.
2. Set your camera to shoot JPG
3. Put your camera on a tripod (some of your exposures will need to have a longer shutter speed; when dealing with long exposures it is best to use the self-timer so that you are not causing handshake)
4. Set your camera to 100 ISO (or your lowest available ISO) and take a shot at each of your noise reduction settings. Be sure to take note of your shutter speed and aperture for each shot.
5. Set your camera to 800 ISO and take a shot at each of your noise reduction settings. Be sure to take note of your shutter speed and aperture for each shot.
6. Set your camera to 3200 or higher and take a shot at each of your noise reduction settings. Be sure to take note of your shutter speed and aperture for each shot.
7. Open your images in Lightroom and view the images at 100%
8. Take a screen shot of a part of each image viewed at 100%(choose an area with a variety of brightnesses and textures and colours if possible, and select the same area in each image)
9. Post each screen shot to your blog, including your camera settings (ISO, aperture, shutter speed, and noise reduction setting chosen) Total of 9 images (depending on how many noise reduction settings you have.
10. Write a description of how your camera did with the in-camera noise reduction. Did it loose detail? Would you use your camera noise reduction as a method of decreasing noise? If you have multiple noise reduction settings, which one gave the best results without loosing sharpness?




White Balance: 


1. Shoot in an area where there are two different colours of light


     · ex: near a window where you are getting shade light and fluorescent light. Shoot the scene with AWB, shade preset, and fluorescent preset. Submit: these three images. Describe how the colour changes in each image (even if the changes are subtle)

2. In a second situation purposefully shoot with the wrong WB preset in order to introduce an overall colour cast to your image. Describe how this changes the feel of the image/scene for the
better and for the worse.


These 13 images are due on your blog before the end of the day.